What To Do This Week – 28th July – 3 August

What To Do This Week – 28th July – 3 August

tying friendship bracelets

It’s the International Day of Friendship on the 30th.

Let’s get out there and connect with our existing friends and try making some new ones – help out with community projects or even get to know the friends of some of our other family members.  You’ll learn a lot about family members from their friends :)

 

International Friendship Day International Day of Friendship (30th)
International Day of Friendship is a day for celebrating friendship and encouraging solidarity and reconciliation.

Whatever you do this week, be awesome #kidsdoinggenealogy.

If you want to trace your family tree, why not get our FREE Workbook by joining our mailing list on the homepage of this site or HERE

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What Every Grandparent Needs to Know…

What Every Grandparent Needs to Know…

rubbish skip

What Every Grandparent Needs to Know About Passing on Their Family Tree

You’re going to discover 5 easy ways to engage and inspire your grandchildren to be more interested in family stories that will hopefully lead to them being more open to the idea of eventually becoming a genealogist, or at least looking after what you have spent so much time lovingly crafting – their heritage.

How do you think you’d feel if you saw your descendents eventually throwing all of your hard-fought family tree research on the skip? Think it won’t happen? Go to any carboot sale or charity shop and you’ll see books with inscriptions in them dated back to the 1800’s. Go to any antique fair and you’ll find war medals with inscriptions on sale. One dealer I spoke to said he buys them up just so they won’t be melted down!

How sad is that?

But the truth of the matter is we don’t have space to keep these things right now.

But we need to hold space for those things because they are so important to us, they connect us to where we came from and maybe even where we’re going. The only way to guarantee that won’t happen is to engage and inspire your descendents with the stories and the emotions behind the memorabilia and then the paperwork sort of becomes a necessity, a bit like a provenance.

Are our children really interested in family? I firmly believe they are, nowadays children are far more connected via social media to their friends and family than ever before. And in this increasingly disconnected world we live in, there has never been a better time to nurture those family connections than right now.

But how to do it? Or even, more to the point, can I do it?

Yes, yes, and yes again, you absolutely can.

Whether you live around the corner or in different continents, you can absolutely keep in touch with your grandchildren and pass on family stories to them and it should be a priority to do so, which I’m sure it is.

Assuming you have a great relationship with mom and dad, you can work together to plan how you manage this whether local or long-distance. So let’s get down to the nitty gritty of the five how to’s.

  1. Skype each other. It’s free and you can even record the conversations. Set aside a time each week, or more frequently if desired, to talk to your grandchildren. You can even make it a celebration sometimes, perhaps you can celebrate a birthday online. Skype is such a fantastic tool for bringing people together. I couldn’t live without it, knowing that at any time I can speak to my son at university is absolutely brilliant. Don’t forget we have project sheets especially for birthdays, you can get yours HERE.
  2. Set up a memory box. You can either do this online or physically. Get them to send photographs and scans of the pictures they draw so you can keep them, or maybe even scrapbook them and send that through the post or hand it to them when you or they visit. What a fabulous birthday present to get presented with a scrapbook of the previous 12 months of your life? You can get a free project sheet of making a memory box HERE.
  3. Get involved. Are they currently involved in a history project at school? Can you contribute anything to that? Perhaps you could hook them up with an older relative for them to interview them about their experiences? Do they have themed book days at school, like Victorian Days. You could maybe find some pictures of your ancestors to give them some ideas about what kind of dress to wear for the day.
  4. Interview them. Yes, interview THEM. Make them feel important, they love to feel that their voice is being heard, get them to a do a scrapbook or journal of their life. Want more inspiration – get our project sheets HERE.
  5. Create a family cookbook. This is something that can be achieved physically or online. Gather recipes together and make sure you tell them that this one is Auntie May’s Magical Mince Pies or Grandma’s Gorgeous Granola (give recipes interesting names). Again you could print this out and send it off in the post, but both of you can print it out at home. We cover this project too.

So it’s not soo difficult to keep your grandchildren interested and engaged in family matters. Make it fun and be enthusiastic and they’ll come back for more.

Don’t make the mistake of ramming family tree connections down their throats, they won’t thank you for it and it will turn them off. Just gently ease them along getting them more and more interested in what’s happening in their own lives and it will create a sense of belonging and closeness that money just can’t buy.

If you are interested in getting our free project sheets, more ideas on how to motivate kids and a 40 page workbook that they can begin to fill in when they’re ready, then let us have your name and email address HERE and we’ll get those sent off to you.

Do you want this to happen?

meme of boy at computer "yes, finally, genealogy rocks"

Hopefully, this will be the ultimate goal.  So what do you get if you sign up for our free course.

  • Your first set of project sheets absolutely free
  • Instructional videos on how to approach the craft and how to create the items
  • Written instructions for each craft in PDF format
  • A mini-email course giving you even more ideas of how to motivate your kids
  • A 40 page workbook that’s appealing and visual for children to fill in when they’re ready

Then when you’re ready to move on and get more involved, get the full course of

  • 48 more projects, delivered monthly (four per month)
  • Instructional videos on how to approach the craft and how to create the items
  • Written instructions for each craft in PDF format

And all for just £27 – that’s 50p per project.  BUY IT HERE

Is that a price you’re willing to pay for not having your stuff thrown on the tip or end up at the charity shop or carboot sale?

Only you know the answer to that.

I believe that #kidsdoinggenealogy is what it has to be about else they lose all their precious family connections.

 

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Family’s Combined Age is 1,000!

Family’s Combined Age is 1,000!

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2703413/Our-generation-game-Baby-four-grandparents-great-grandparents.html#ixzz38NH33KkJ Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Courtesy of DailyMail
Fourteen to one: (front) Becky Bourton and Lee Blaylock with Lyvia; (seated, from left) Rob and Vicky Bourton, Gill and David Blaylock; (standing, from left) Ron and June Bourton, Gordon and Elizabeth Lamprey, Sylvia and Norman Wakeley, Norah and Arthur Blaylock

Many young children would feel lucky to have a full set of grandparents to spoil them on special occasions.

But eight-week-old Lyvia Blaylock is much more fortunate. Not only does she have all four grandparents – she has all eight great grandparents too.

The three generations above her have a combined age of more than 1,000.

Read the FULL article HERE.

Wow!  They’re going to have SOME memories to pass down to that child!
If you want to trace or record your family tree, why not get our FREE Workbook by joining our mailing list on the homepage of this site or HERE

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What To Do This Week – 21st-27th July

What To Do This Week – 21st-27th July

commonwealth games

What do do this week features coming together, working together.  What an awesome idea.  What about hosting your own commonwealth games – get friends and family members to meet at the local park at the weekend, ask everyone to bring a picnic and then play games.  It will take a bit of organisation but it will be fun and is good not only for the community but your friendship circle too.

Whatever you do this week, be awesome #kidsdoinggenealogy.

If you want to trace your family tree, why not get our FREE Workbook by joining our mailing list on the homepage of this site or HERE

 

Commonwealth Games Commonwealth Games (23rd July to 3rd August)
The Commonwealth Games are held every four years, with atheletes from all over the Commonwealth of Nations taking part. In 2014 they will be held in Glasgow. The Glasgow 2014 site has more information about this event.
International Friendship Day International Day of Friendship (30th)
International Day of Friendship is a day for celebrating friendship and encouraging solidarity and reconciliation.

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What To Do This Week – 14th-20th July

What To Do This Week – 14th-20th July

nelson mandela 208

This week let’s concentrate on helping to change the world for the better.  And what better way than to connect with our families.  Family life and the core values we learn all come from our interraction with family before anyone else.  Yes we are swayed and convinced to take different actions by our lifestyle and the company we keep, but our inherent moral compass comes from our family. Take time this week to call up granny or grandad, connect with them and maybe go visit if you can.  Or if that isn’t possible, send them a card – better still, make them a card.

 

Bastille Day Bastille Day (14th)
The French National Day, commemorating the storming of the Bastille Prison in 1789.
St Swithin's Day St. Swithin’s Day (15th)
On St. Swithin’s Day, people watch the weather. Tradition says that whatever the weather is like on St. Swithin’s Day, it will continue for the next forty days.
Mandela Day Mandela Day (18th)
Mandela Day aims to inspire individuals to take action to help change the world for the better. “Take Action; Inspire Change; Make Every Day a Mandela Day.” The Mandela Day site has lots of useful ideas and resources.

Whatever you do this week, be awesome #kidsdoinggenealogy.

If you want to trace your family tree, why not get our FREE Workbook by joining our mailing list on the homepage of this site or HERE

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A Bucket, a Broom and a Duster!

A Bucket, a Broom and a Duster!

blue sweeping brush

Or so the old song goes….

Yeah, right – as if any of us do the housework INSTEAD of doing family tree – lol.

Well, I wasn’t exactly meaning what I said. Basically, whether your house is clean or not is your own affair – mine isn’t pristine, there are more important things in life to do – like family tree research.

But there is an even more important thing we should be doing? We should be documenting, recording and preserving our research for generations to come.

We also need to consider who our predecessor will be. If we were running some huge family-built conglomerate of a business, we’d have an ‘in line for the throne’ position already lined up. Shouldn’t we be thinking along those lines now?

But how do you make the younger generation change their tune regarding the ‘housework’ of family tree research, i.e. the need for a duster and hoover (hence the title) to clean up all the accumulated layers of dirt and grime on those dusty old archives that us ‘oldies’ have to trawl through.

Little do they know that these rough, old hands love caressing the leather of old books and quite enjoy the musty smell of ancient paper and beam with delight when we are able to distinguish a word in Latin that opens up a whole new world of research on our ancestor.

It comes with age, I’m sure. When I started my tree back in 1969, I don’t think I was quite as in love with old stuff as I am now.

So it’s up to us to portray to youngsters that it’s not all about dusty archives and trawling through pages and pages of stuff and not finding anything of interest to us personally.

We learn as we age that there is value to be had in just reading about these kinds of things as they give us an overall picture of life at that time even though it may not be pertinent or relevant to our particular ancestor.

We have to be a bit of a politician if you like – be our own Spin Doctor. Concentrate on the highs not the lows and we all experience those. You know that it’s a bit like labour – once the baby is born you forget the pain – once the snippet of information is found, you forget the years it took to find, you relish the moment.

That’s what you need to get over to youngsters. Remember the moment you find information and recreate that feeling when you talk about your research to them.

So be enthusiastic and upbeat, don’t think that because they don’t seem enthusiastic we shouldn’t be. It could just be the one thing that’s lacking in how we put our research across. Be proud to be the family historian and go out there and be your own spin doctor. You can do this too.

Do you have advanced research skills like being able to read Latin or something? Engage with us on our Facebook page and let us know what you’re good at www.facebook.com/findourfamily

And don’t forget let us have your feedback below as to how you’re getting your young people engaged and inspired in your heritage.

[Tweet “A bucket, a broom and a duster! Urgh, what’s that got to do with genealogy #findourfamily”

 

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Are you infectious?

Are you infectious?

red yellow capsules medication

No, I don’t mean have you got some nasty mean bugs running around in your system. Is your love of genealogy infectious? Do you positively beam about it when you recount tales or do you hide your light under a bushel?

I don’t know about you but I tend to be the latter and not because I don’t love my family history or I’m not excited about it, but no one else tends to be – so that’s a big turn off isn’t it?

I think my family try hard to be interested for my sake, but unless I make it interesting, they don’t really want to know. It’s harder to get adults to take much notice of you when they’re not interested but you can at least have ‘a stab’ at engaging younger minds to hopefully follow in your lifetime pursuit.

My latest family project is a video-type Powerpoint presentation of a family member that I’m hoping will attract more attention. I’ll update you on that as and when. I asked one of my family if they would consider doing an oral history for me and they went green! So I think kids are our only hope! LOL.

Kids are more much ready to accept us as we are, no sides, they don’t have years of ingrained ideas about who and what you are and who did what to whom in another lifetime. You know – the usual family dramas.

Kids are much more of a clean slate that you can begin afresh with. So give them a sense of “I can do this too” when you engage in crafts with them, think outside the box and look for new ways that you could research your family tree. Do you take as much advantage of technology as you could?

Do you just research but never document anything or present it in an attractive way? All guilty of that one, I’m afraid. I just assemble stuff in boxes to do something with one day. Well, that one day is coming on fast, I can tell you.

So be enthusiastic, be inspirational, be the one the kids love coming to talk to about family tree because you make it so interesting and relevant to them. You can do this too.

Do you create lovely family tree projects? Post some photographs on our Facebook page and let us know what you’re thinking at www.facebook.com/findourfamily

And don’t forget let us have your feedback as to how you’re getting your young people engaged and inspired in your heritage.

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Raining Cats & Dogs? Dish the dirt on the Ancestors…

Raining Cats & Dogs? Dish the dirt on the Ancestors…

toddler in rain cape

Picture the scene, it’s raining outside and the kids are twiddling their thumbs. They’ve come to grandma’s for the day and you don’t know what to do with them. They don’t want to go out, they don’t want to play a game or watch television. They want something different.

When my kids were little, hands up, I put them in front of the box and allowed them to play computer games. I have two extremely talented techie sons now but at a cost (I believe), in being a little more isolated and happy with their own company. Still – one works full-time as a phone repair technician and the other one is studying for his music degree and hopes to go into studio composing, so they’ve both done okay for themselves.

But back to our bored children! You would love to pass on your fanatical interest in family tree but every time you approach it, their eyes roll and they get that wonderful glazed look that only children have mastered and perfected over the years.

What to do?

Tell them you’re bored as well! Be human. Say, I fancy doing something crafty this afternoon as the weather’s so horrible. Go hunting for stuff to use, don’t just bring your craft box down. Make the whole process of doing the craft part of the fun. You’ll know what sort of things you have where in the house, but they won’t know that – so go on a treasure hunt to begin with to find things to use.

Next, you can start to assemble what you need and begin a craft project. However good or bad it is doesn’t matter, what matters is that you are doing it together. Just don’t make it a show and tell session that’s all about YOU.Why engage children in craft or activities?

Everyone has a different way of learning, auditory, visual and kinaesthetic. Craft encompasses all of them.

Auditory learners prefer to listen to explanations rather than read them. That’s how I learn best

Visual learners like to look at demonstrations, videos and don’t focus as well when just listening to an explanation. I’ve realised that I don’t like podcasts half as much as I like videos. I think a lot of women are visual learners, Pinterest is testament to that. I think 80% of Pinterest subscribers are women.

Kinesthetic learners learn best through touch or a hands-on experience and writing it down helps as well.

I discovered when I took my Administration degree back in 2000 at the age of 45 that I learnt better by reading books, taking test papers but also writing down the main areas with bullet points on cards. That helped my revision no end.

So we all learn differently, but hopefully our course encompasses all the three different styles of learning so that they appeal to everyone.

How do you learn? Are you a visual, auditory or kinesthetic learner. Let us know what you think in the comments below.

And don’t forget let us have your feedback as to how you’re getting your young people engaged and inspired in your heritage.

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Don’t Leave Me Out!

Don’t Leave Me Out!

child doing crafts

No one likes to feel left out, do they? Especially not children. They crave so much of our attention and in our busy world, it’s easy to put them in front of the television or computer nowadays.

I know from personal experience that bringing up two young boys who were 16 months apart, without the help of any family members, took the wind out of my sails and add to that a child who wouldn’t sleep and you had a recipe for an extremely tired and stressed-out set of parents. Computers and televisions unfortunately seemed like a god-send to me. That said, I did craft work and ‘school-work’ with them when they were on holidays from school, so not all bad J

So whilst we need to ‘box clever’ in terms of getting our family tree across to the younger generation, we also have to be mindful that we also include them in the process.

So when we talk about doing projects that we want help with, we may initially be ‘ignoring’, to some extent, the history and experiences of the child but we are hoping to engage some interest and by the sheer fact of asking for their help, they are included.

However, we still need to make it about them, we still need to be using projects and crafts to provide the ‘lead-in’ to talk about other things. If you are scrapbooking a page for instance about your mum, then ask the child what their mum’s favourite flowers are, or where she likes dad to take her when they go out together.

So still make it about THEM whilst using craft projects to gain that all important ‘foot-in-the-door’ to begin the conversation. Good luck.

Do you think children watch too much television nowadays? Let us know what you think on our Facebook page.

And don’t forget let us have your feedback as to how you’re getting your young people engaged and inspired in your heritage.

 

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Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above may be “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless , I only recommend products or services I use personally and/or believe will add value to my readers.

 

How to Inspire & Engage your Grandkids

How to Inspire & Engage your Grandkids

grandparents grandchildren sharing

We know you love your hobby, genealogy is a bug, we’ve all got it, we can’t put it down, we want to tell the world about it but very few people listen, especially the most important ones, our younger family members.

How would you love to engage and inspire your nieces, nephews, grandchildren or even children to not only want to get involved in family tree but maybe perhaps take it over in the future.

How would you feel if you knew your legacy was safe and it wouldn’t get discarded in some dusty old corner of the loft rotting away for generation after generation. All of that hard work, effort and love that you put in gone to waste.

Just knowing there is a custodian of it, who not only feels the need to preserve it for the future but actively wants to do so.

Insert big sigh of relief. I know I felt the same when my youngest said he’d look after it for me. Nothing more, but it won’t get thrown away.

So why do we need to do this?

Well not only will it help preserve the family documents and research that we have already accumulated over the years, but it will also foster an interest in the family history that the younger generation have never really taken an interest in.

Kids get very bored, very quickly so if they think you’re going to be lecturing them they will switch off. It’s no good getting down the family tree sheet from the ‘get go’ and spouting names and dates at them. It will just turn them off, it’s like school.

They learn better, and more quickly if we make it fun. They are better engaged, they release feel-good hormones when they are happy, relaxed and having fun (as we all do) and it’s this receptive state we need to create before we can begin to impart information to them.

So, how do you do that?  Are you ready to begin an exciting journey with us, to working on craft projects together and don’t worry, they aren’t difficult. They are made to be super-easy because this isn’t about crafting, this is about engaging children. So it doesn’t matter how good or how bad the craft, the aim is to do the craft together. The objective is to get children involved in a fun way that will allow your knowledge and enthusiasm to shine through but also to nurture that vital spark of enthusiasm in them to want to get involved too, if only for the short time you’re crafting or playing a game together.

Can’t wait to share the videos with you – sign up HERE and then give us  your feedback as to how you’re getting your young people engaged and inspired in your heritage.

Engage with us on our Facebook page too.

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Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above may be “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless , I only recommend products or services I use personally and/or believe will add value to my readers.